Great Gray Owl. Photo: Melissa Groo/Audubon Photography Awards

Saturday, July 15

Saturday, July 15

DAY 2 | OVERVIEW

8:30am – 10:00am: Opening Plenary with Keynote Speaker – David Yarnold

10:30am – 12:00pm: Concurrent Session A

12:00pm – 1:00pm: Lunch

1:15pm – 2:45pm: Concurrent Session B

3:00pm – 4:45pm: Flyway Meetings

6:00pm – 8:00pm: Audubon Convention Banquet with Awards Presentations and a Conversation with Kenn Kaufman

*Detailed session information below.


Morning Schedule:

Time Name
10:30 am – 12:00 pm The Global Importance of Saline Lakes and Growing a Network To Save Them
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Creating a Rewarding Volunteer Experience
10:30am – 12:00 pm Expanding Your Flock: Being Intentional about Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Plants for Birds: Audubon’s Native Plants Toolkit and Resources
10:30 am – 12:00 pm How To Secure Press Coverage and Work with the Media
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Mapping For Everyone: Accessing Audubon’s GIS Resources
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Advocacy for Birds: How To Become a Champion for Birds and Conservation
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Science-Inspired Conservation: Wetland Restoration in the Great Lakes Region
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Values at Play: Balancing the Needs of Birds and People
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Q&A with Audubon CEO David Yarnold and Board Chair Maggie Walker

The Global Importance of Saline Lakes and Growing a Network To Save Them

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Great Salt Lake had record low water levels in 2016. Across the Intermountain West, saline lake ecosystems are essential to millions of migratory shorebirds and waterbirds but face increasing threats from water diversions and climate change. Audubon’s new Saline Lakes Program aims to secure the best outcomes for birds and people. From Audubon’s Gillmor Sanctuary, where water is managed to help shorebirds, to the Salton Sea, where habitat needs were recently modeled to inform restoration, this session will focus on saline lakes, priority birds, and steps we can take together.


Creating a Rewarding Volunteer Experience

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Volunteer engagement, recruitment and management is at the core of Audubon’s existence, and yet most Audubon chapters struggle to recruit and retain volunteers. This workshop will show you how to maximize your ability to recruit the right types of volunteers, manage them to realize your mission, and retain them as part of your loyal workforce. Featuring the hands-on development of a volunteer engagement, recruitment, and management plan, this workshop will encourage you to increase reliance on volunteers as strong partners through evidence-based best practices.


Expanding Your Flock: Being Intentional about Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

This workshop is for those who would like to kick-start or reevaluate their organization’s diversity, equity, and inclusion work. Together we will focus on planning effective and mindful engagement with existing members and the communities we live in, but perhaps haven’t fully represented. The goal of this session is to get specific about how we approach DEI work by creating action plans with the support of peers and a facilitator. Those interested in unpacking the complexities contained within the topic of diversity, equity, and inclusion are encouraged to attend and actively participate.


Plants for Birds: Audubon’s Native Plants Toolkit and Resources

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Audubon’s Plants for Birds program includes an extensive toolkit to support grassroots native plant programs. This session will be an interactive introduction to the resources in the toolkit, presented by Audubon staff and chapter leaders. You’ll hear how grassroots leaders have put these resources to work in their communities. You’ll learn how to access and customize the resources for your own local needs, and you’ll also get a tour of the Plants for Birds searchable database, which provides native plants information at the ZIP code level and local retailers and Audubon contacts.


How To Secure Press Coverage and Work with the Media

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

This session will offer tactics you can easily use to secure earned media coverage as well as tips on how to react to unanticipated media inquiries. Topics covered will include: 1. How to secure media coverage in print, digital, broadcast media; 2. How to pitch stories and build relationships with reporters; 3. How to build and maintain relationships with local and state media; 4. How to amplify press coverage via storytelling, events, tours, etc.; 5. How to secure media that reaches Spanish speakers and other diverse target audiences; and 6. How to find media contacts via social media.


Mapping For Everyone: Accessing Audubon’s GIS Resources

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Maps are critical for understanding our world. This session will orient participants to the mapping resources available to members of the Audubon network through a unique partnership between Audubon and Esri (a premier mapping software company). Participants will hear case studies on how chapters and staff use maps to plan campaigns, meet conservation goals, and increase communication about their work.


Advocacy for Birds: How To Become a Champion for Birds and Conservation

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Building influence in your community and with elected officials (within the legal limits of your nonprofit status) has never been more important for bird-loving conservationists. This workshop will walk you through a rapid assessment of your advocacy capabilities and help you become a relationship-building powerhouse with real social and political influence. You’ll hear from experts and fellow grassroots leaders, and you’ll build an action plan that will have you interacting meaningfully with your elected officials over the rest of 2017 and beyond. The birds are counting on you.


Science-Inspired Conservation: Wetland Restoration in the Great Lakes Region

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Audubon is building a network in the Great Lakes region to protect and restore critical habitat for breeding and migratory birds, while improving water quality and building resiliency to climate change. This session will explore how science and diverse partnerships are creating a powerful conservation movement. Through regional secretive marsh-bird monitoring, in-depth Black Tern research, and scientifically robust spatial prioritization, Audubon is deepening engagement and building sustainable restoration and stewardship practices throughout the region.


Q&A with Audubon CEO David Yarnold and Board Chair Maggie Walker

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

You’ll have a chance to talk face-to-face with Audubon’s CEO David Yarnold and Board Chair Maggie Walker in an intimate small group setting. Each session will last 45 minutes and is limited to 10 participants. Space is first-come, first-served, so register soon!


Afternoon Schedule:

Time Name
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Social Media Mastery
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Building Bridges Across Divides: Finding Common Ground
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Plants for Birds in Schools and Gardens
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Embrace the Future: Succession Planning and Long-Term Sustainability of Audubon Chapters
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Local Solutions to Climate Change: How Audubon Chapters and Local Youth Can Make Cities Clean Energy Leaders
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm The Art of Collaboration I: Projects and Short-term Partnerships
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Coastal Bird Stewardship: A New Toolkit For Local Conservation Action
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Junior Audubon Clubs: Lessons for Building Environmental Stewardship Today
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Grassland Birds, Their Challenges, and How You Can Help
1:15 pm – 2:45 pm Q&A with Audubon CEO David Yarnold and Board Chair Maggie Walker

Social Media Mastery

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and more – how do you keep up with the ever-growing suite of social media platforms? Where should you put your limited time and resources in order to yield the greatest return? Which tools can help you do more in less time? Join us as we dive into today’s social media landscape, examining which platforms are best to reach, engage, and activate your audiences. Learn how social media efforts can enrich your communication efforts and walk away with techniques that will help you build a vibrant, supportive online community.


Building Bridges Across Divides: Finding Common Ground

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

The National Coalition Building Institute’s Controversial Issue Process (CIP) equips leaders with new tools to constructively and positively deal with tough conflicts, enabling them to move both sides toward future cooperation. The NCBI CIP provides a structured methodology that allows people on both sides of an entrenched issue to express their concerns, to listen attentively to the other side, and then to reframe the issue in a way that respectfully takes into account the concerns of both sides. The skills that the NCBI CIP teaches are applicable to any conflict situation or clash.


Plants for Birds in Schools and Gardens

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Local native plant programs that focus on schoolyards and other community spaces can meet educational, engagement, and conservation goals at the same time. This session will draw from grassroots experience and expertise around Audubon’s network to show how to develop a schoolyard/green space program that can achieve measurable impact. The session will include small-group work to develop local action plans and participants will have access to an online training platform containing resource materials that they can receive and contribute to.


Embrace the Future: Succession Planning and Long-Term Sustainability of Audubon Chapters

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Having a sustainable pipeline of future leaders is one of the biggest concerns expressed by Audubon chapters. Workshop participants will construct the beginnings of an organizational succession plan through interactive exercises aimed at developing a plan to recruit and equip future leaders. Plan components will include opportunities for cross-training, building a “bench,” and grooming up-and-coming volunteers or staff with the desire to take a more robust future leadership role. This session will be even more valuable if attended by teams from each chapter.


Local Solutions to Climate Change: How Audubon Chapters and Local Youth Can Make Cities Clean Energy Leaders

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

We all know birds will be affected by climate change. So, too, will today’s youth who are tomorrow’s conservationists. Join us at this workshop and walk away with a road map for how Audubon chapters and grassroots leaders can partner with youth to drive clean energy and climate solutions at the local level. Through a dynamic partnership with iMatter, a national campaign launched by youth, Audubon chapters and volunteer leaders can set their town or city on a path toward becoming a clean energy leader that both youth and birds can be proud of!


The Art of Collaboration I: Projects and Short-term Partnerships

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Success in a short-term collaborative project requires clearly-defined roles and responsibilities, and agreement on a specific outcome. This session will explore four local projects and learn from their experiences. 1. Allegheny County Chimney Swift Tower project (Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania). 2. Washington Climate Initiative (Seattle Audubon Society). 3. Urban Bird Habitat Initiative/Bird-friendly Habitat Restoration (Birmingham Audubon Society). 4. Urban Heronry “Intervention” (Golden Gate Audubon Society).


Coastal Bird Stewardship: A New Toolkit For Local Conservation Action

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Coastal birds and communities face many serious threats, but you can make a difference. If you work in a coastal area, you won’t want to miss this workshop, which will feature an introduction to Audubon’s brand new Coastal Birds Stewardship Toolkit. You’ll learn about the tools and technology available to you, and you’ll network with coastal program leaders from Audubon chapters, states and centers, and the national office. You’ll leave with an action plan to help build a healthy, thriving coast for birds and people in your area.


Junior Audubon Clubs: Lessons for Building Environmental Stewardship Today

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Arguably the most successful conservation education program of the past century, Junior Audubon Clubs engaged millions of children in bird protection and appreciation – creating a generation of new conservationists in the 20th century. Why was Junior Audubon so transformative, and what lessons can we learn and apply to Audubon programs today? This presentation will not only look back on the history of this successful program, it will also explore its relevance to today. It will examine how to implement equally impactful programs through exploring new research into conservation psychology.


Grassland Birds, Their Challenges, and How You Can Help

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

Grassland birds are beautiful, fascinating habitat specialists – and most are facing steep decline despite decades of conservation action. But there is hope, and in this session, you’ll learn about Audubon’s new Conservation Ranching program, conservation success in Chicago prairies, the Farm Bill, new science, and international partnerships. The session will close with an interactive panel discussion that features scientists and ranchers working on-the-ground, and highlights opportunities for chapters and grassroots conservationists to get involved and make a difference locally.


Q&A with Audubon CEO David Yarnold and Board Chair Maggie Walker

1:15 pm – 2:45 pm

You’ll have a chance to talk face-to-face with Audubon’s CEO David Yarnold and Board Chair Maggie Walker in an intimate small group setting. Each session will last 45 minutes and is limited to 10 participants. Space is first-come, first-served, so register soon!